Manx Churches and Chapels

Join me on my journey to picture every Church and Chapel on the Isle of Man.

Built on the site of an ancient keeill, the chapel of St John was first referred to in 1557, but was likely to have been built before this date. In 1847 the chapel was demolished and in 1849 this beautiful building was constructed from local granite and marble.

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Royal Chapel St Johns © Peter Killey - www.manxscenes.com

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I just love this stained glass window above the Altar at Santon Parish Church which depicts The Last Supper.

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Santon Church - the Last Supper © Peter Killey - www.manxscenes.com

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Located between Port Erin on the east and Port St Mary in the west, the present church was extended in 1775 and is on the site of an even more ancient building, the church is built in a Manx style and has a whitewashed exterior.

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Rushen Parish Church © Peter Killey - www.manxscenes.com

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This church was built in 1835 (the former church dated from the 12th century) The building is of plain cruciform design and is built in brown stone with a large square tower.

There are five Bishops buried in the graveyard, Bishops Wilson, Hildesley, Mason, Crigan and Duesbury.

I actually went into the graveyard to have a look at these graves and I kid you not I was chased out by two sheep, one of which had long horns.

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St Michael's Church in Kirk Michael © Peter Killey - www.manxscenes.com

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“We honour and remember their sacrifice”

War Graves at St. Patrick’s Church in Jurby

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Jurby Church War Graves © Peter Killey - www.manxscenes.com

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A lovely feature to the entrance of this Church is this hand carved Lychgate. The foundation stone (bottom centre right) was laid on Easter Monday in 1907 by the Lieutenant Governor Lord Raglan, and it was formally opened on 16th October. 1907 by the Governors wife Lady Raglan.

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St. Michael's Kirk Michael © Peter Killey - www.manxscenes.com

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Marown Parish is dedicated to St Runius or Ronan (Ma-Ronan) and is the only landlocked parish on the Island. It is thought that originally Marown and Santan were a single parish but the division had occurred by the 14th Century.

Once this was the Parish church and was situated in about the centre of the Parish. The original building was from approximately 1200 AD and was enlarged in 1754 AD (see below image of slate cross above West doorway and inscribed with 1754) by extending the church westwards by about 5m. The original part of the church can still be seen in the eastern half. The original door was in the south wall (behind the now Altar) although blocked off it can still be traced in the outside stonework.

A new door has much earlier moulded door jamb-stones which, according to records in 1778, were retrieved from St. Trinians. At about the same time the stone steps up to the Western gallery were added to house musicians etc.  The door below the gallery entrance has huge flanking stones from a much earlier site.

When the new church on the Main Douglas to Peel road was built in 1860 the old church of St. Runius was used as a mortuary chapel.

The building was restored by volunteer labour and reopened on August 9th 1959. Services are now held during the summer and for all major festivals.

As can be seen by the images there is no mains electricity and this quaint church relies on candle light.

Three bishops are possibly buried here; Lonnan, Connaghan, and Runius.

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St Runius Church Marown © Peter Killey - www.manxscenes.comSt Runius Church Marown © Peter Killey - www.manxscenes.com St Runius Church Marown © Peter Killey - www.manxscenes.comSt Runius Church Marown © Peter Killey - www.manxscenes.comSt Runius Church Marown © Peter Killey - www.manxscenes.com St Runius Church Marown © Peter Killey - www.manxscenes.com

 

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Standing inside Old Ballaugh Church at the Cronk and looking out towards the famous leaning entrance pillars.

This little Church always intrigues me with its leaning entrance pillars, I have heard so many myths about the reasons why the pillars are leaning that I just don’t really know what to believe now!

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Ballaugh Old Church at the Cronk © Peter Killey - www.manxscenes.com

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The first glimpse of sunshine for about a week on the Isle of Man so went for a walk up to Maughold Church.

The mountain is North Barrule and the ridge top left takes you over to Clagh Ouyr.

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Maughold Church looking towards North Barrule Mountain © Peter Killey - www.manxscenes.com

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St Patricks Church was built in 1829 and stands high up on the sandy coastline on Jurby Head.

The image was captured on my Sony HX20V camera, resized and cropped in Adobe Photoshop CC.

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St Patricks Church or better known as Jurby Church © Peter Killey

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