Ballaugh Old Church

All posts tagged Ballaugh Old Church

Looking very Christmassy at this lovely old Church in Ballaugh today.

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Christmas at the Cronk in Ballaugh © Peter Killey - www.manxscenes.com

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A slightly different perspective of Ballaugh Old Church at the Cronk and it’s famous leaning entrance pillars..

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Ballaugh Old Church © Peter Killey - www.manxscenes.com

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(Manx National Heritage catalogued Cross No. 106)

This 10th Century cross-slab was found in the churchyard in 1891 and is the only Runic Cross to be found in Ballaugh to date.

The Cross is 4’6″ high and 20″ across the head and the stone is 3″ thick.

The cross shows features of the famous sculptor, Gaut and it’s weather worn runes testify that this cross was erected by Olaf Liotulfson in memory of Ulf, his son.

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Ballaugh Cross © Peter Killey - manxscenes.com

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The first image is taken at the Isle of Man Flower Festival at the quaint Cronk Church in Ballaugh, there is a sort of alternative festival going on also at Jurby Church with lots of knitted flowers and characters like these guys in image two, I must say the ham sandwiches look nice 🙂

The images were captured on my Sony HX20V camera, resized, cropped in Adobe Photoshop CS6.

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Flower Festival Ballaugh Old Church -  © Peter Killey

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Knitted Charachters Jurby Church  -  © Peter Killey

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The old Church of Ballaugh occupies an elevated position close to a sheltered creek of the sea, and at the junction of coast and landward tracks-a site which must have been important in prehistoric times. A hundred yards east of the churchyard at one period stood a tumulus at a spot still marked by the swell of the ground, and there are two holy wells not far away.

As in the case of the other Manx parish churches, old St Mary’s contains in its walls materials from previous works, and is probably an epitome in stone of all the sacred buildings and monuments which have occupied the church enclosure since Neolithic man came to the Island.

The church was enlarged by Bishop Wilson and Dr. Walker in 1717, a date commemorated on the weathercock which surmounts the characteristic and attractive bell turret of the period.

Upon a petition from the parishioners a gallery was added in the second half of the 18th century. The approach was by an external double staircase over the main entrance.

After the building of the new church in 1833 old St. Mary’s became ruinous but received a new lease of life in 1849, when the building was shortened and the gallery and stairs removed..

This was during the Rectorate of Thomas Howard, the memory of whose mild and benignant personality still lingers with old people in the parish.

In 1877 the church was once again rescued from decay by Rector Kermode, and has ever since been kept in a good state of repair.

Click on any of the below images for a larger view.

Ballaugh Old Church - © Peter Killey

Another lovely ancient feature to this beautiful church is the font (and a more modern day lid) which is of unknown antiquity. It is made of red sandstone block built into a window seat. It is decorated with a cross, once painted in blue and red, and a beautiful inscription in Gaelic Manx reads:

“Ta un Chiarn, un Credjue, un Vashtey, Un Jee as Ayr jeh ooilley”

Which simply translates in Gaelic Manx to:

“There is one Lord, one Faith, one Baptism, One God and Father of all.”

The Ancient Font in Ballaugh old Church - © Peter Killey

The Ancient Font in Ballaugh old Church - © Peter Killey

As previously stated the church was enlarged by Bishop Wilson and Dr. Walker in 1717, a date commemorated on the weathercock which surmounts the characteristic and attractive bell turret of the period (below image).

Old Ballaugh Church Extended in 1717 - © Peter Killey

Below is a hand drawn image of Ballaugh Old Church which is displayed to the rear of the the Church, the author of the image is unknown!

Hand Drawn Picture of Ballaugh Old Church (author unknown) - © Peter Killey

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This quaint little church is situated at the Cronk in Ballaugh and has gone through many changes, in its present form it is only half the size that it had been in the 18th century, the church is also very well known for it’s leaning entrance gate pillars.

The image was captured on my Fuji X10 camera resized and cropped  in Adobe Photoshop CS6

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N.B There is some further information and images of this church on this section of my website – Manx Churches and Chapels

Ballaugh Old Church - © Peter Killey

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This lovely colourful stained glass window in St. Peter’s Church in Onchan depicts Ballaugh Old Church with it’s famous leaning entrance pillars.

I have taken a number of images of the stained glass windows in St. Peter’s and I will add them to Manxscenes.com over the coming months.

The image was captured on my Nikon S8200 Camera resized and cropped in Adobe Photoshop CS6

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A Stained Glass Window in St. Peter's Church in Onchan - © Peter Killey

 

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This little Church in Ballaugh always intrigues me with its leaning entrance pillars, I have heard so many myths about the reasons why the pillars are leaning that I just don’t really know what to believe now! Can anyone enlighten me?

The image was captured on my Nikon D80 SLR with a Nikon 18-135 F3.5/5.6 G AFS DX lens at 18mm and cropped in Adobe Photoshop CS5.

Click on the image for a larger view!

Ballaugh Old Church - © Peter Killey

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