Manx Churches and Chapels

Join me on my journey to picture every Church and Chapel on the Isle of Man.

I have just read a lovely old Manx book called Legends of a Lifetime by the late George E. Quayle and he makes mention that in 1890 the family of a nearby resident of the Church (Mr Hicks) installed 8 Tubular Bells in the tower of this fine old church in his memory.

George E. Quayle mentions that his parents were married in the church at a similar date and the peal of tubular bells played ‘Abide With Me’ on their wedding day, apparently since then the bells have never played a tune since, apart from the odd jingle on a Sunday and the solemn minute bell for funerals.

I personally did not realise that ‘Abide With Me’ was a wedding hymn but I did think that this is a lovely story worth sharing.

Sadly today this fine old church is now on the open market for sale, a sign of the times indeed.

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Lezayre Church © Peter Killey - www.manxscenes.com

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Ballaugh Old Church at the Cronk.

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Ballaugh Old Church in B&W © Peter Killey - www.manxscenes.com

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A glorious but cold day at Ballaugh old Church at the Cronk.

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Old Ballaugh Church © Peter Killey - www.manxscenes.com

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Some good memories and some sad memories for me with this beautiful Church.

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St Marys Church, Hill Street © Peter Killey - www.manxscenes.com

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A slightly different perspective of Ballaugh Old Church at the Cronk and it’s famous leaning entrance pillars..

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Ballaugh Old Church © Peter Killey - www.manxscenes.com

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The Church of Ninian (now always called Trinian) stands beside the Douglas To Peel Road under Greeba Mountain.

It was built in the 12th century on the site of an ancient keeil and extensively altered in the 14th century.  A number of cross slabs are kept inside the ruined church on the site which has no public access.

The ruins are the scene of the story of the Buggane of St Trinian’s who persistently blew off the church roof as fast as it was rebuilt.  The village tailor undertook to make a pair of breeches as soon as the roof had been completed which would then drive the Buggane away.  The tailor was down to the last button but ran out of thread and whilst away the roof was again blown off.

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St Trinian's © Peter Killey - www.manxscenes.com

St Trinian's © Peter Killey - www.manxscenes.com

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The fine and very impressive interior of St German’s Cathedral in Peel.

Kirk German Cathedral is sited in Derby Road in Peel, and was opened in 1884 and finally consecrated by Archbishop Thompson, Bishop of York in 1894.

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St German's Cathedral in Peel © Peter Killey - www.manxscenes.com

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I went up to Braddan new Cemetery today to listen to local historian Mr Peter Kelly chat to a group of us about the Archibald Knox designed gravestones, and on the way up I couldn’t help capturing this image of the Chapel.

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Braddan New Cemetery © Peter Killey - www.manxscenes.com

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St. Andrew’s Church in Andreas.

During the 1939 – 1945 war the original tower was reduced in height by about half because of the R.A.F airfield nearby (Click Here to see an old image of the Church with its taller tower).

The war memorial has recently been renovated and it is now a terracotta colour.

You can also see further images of Old Manx Churches and Chapels on this website by Clicking Here

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St Andrew's Church in Andreas © Peter Killey - www.manxscenes.com

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This is one of my favourite churches on the Island.

This quaint little church is dedicated to St. Adamnan and is one of the oldest churches on the Island with the walls dating back to the 12th century.

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Old Kirk Lonan © Peter Killey - manxscenes.com

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The parish of Bride is the most northerly of the 17 parishes on the Isle of Man and its church was reputedly founded by St Bridget in the sixth century.

The foundation stone of the present church was laid on July 29, 1869, by the wife of the then Lieutenant Governor, Mrs Loch.

Ewan Christian designed the church based on the simple basilica plan, with a semi-circle apse and high lombardic tower. The edifice comprised a nave and chancel. The windows are all stained glass, all given by benefactors. It can accommodate a congregation of 150.

Dedicated to St Bridget, the church was consecrated on September 8, 1876, by Bishop Selwyn, first bishop of New Zealand, later bishop of Lichfield.

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St Bridget Bride © Peter Killey - www.manxscenes.com

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We had a walk around this lovely Church and the Graveyard the other day.

The image of the Porch shows ‘The Orouboros’ or the snake swallowing its tail inscribed into the upper right sandstone block which is built into this porch, snakes have many symbolic meanings, good and bad, but this one is universal, it represents the concept of infinity – and of the end being also the beginning, we can only guess how this stone came to Maughold Church!

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** Source An introduction into Architecture of the Isle of Man by Patricia Tutt **

Maughold Church Porch © Peter Killey - www.manxscenes.com

Maughold Church Porch © Peter Killey - www.manxscenes.com

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