One comment on “Park Llewellyn & Cornaa Farm Tholtans

  1. Excellent photos capturing the atmosphere of these remote ruins.
    With regard to Park Llewellyn, we have some good surviving documentary evidence of when it was constructed by Ramsey merchant John Llewellyn thanks to him writing letters in 1768 and 1770 to the Duke of Atholl to secure the intack land on which it is built on the slopes of North Barrule from the Duke.
    The letters are part of the Atholl Papers kept by MNH and indicate that Llewelly was intending the house to be a small summer residence and experimental tree plantation called ‘Mount Atholl’ in the Duke’s honour. The letters read as follows:
    1. [From Atholl Papers – AP 36/38 (2nd)-20]
    [Letter from John Lewhellin to Duke of Atholl, 24 June 1768]
    My Lord
    I am greatly obliged to you for your complyance in allowing me to rent a parcell of your commons which your Grace’s stewards have viewed & have fixed thereon the yearly rent of thirty shillings. I proposed at first twenty, as Barrool which adjoins it, & lies more contigious, & contains I think a larger quantity, was rented not many years past to fifteen, & had I made application then, this would have rented at ten shillings. The great expence & difficulty that I shall be at in enclosing it, the north west side there being few or no stones in but what are on the top of the mountain, & rather on the other side, & the ground being in many places so exceeding swampy that there is no possibility of drawing stones, were they tio be had ; & the outer part of the south west side there are no stones to be had but from the top of the mountain ; which upon the whole makes many think the enclosing it with a stone wall, & when that cannot be done, with a sod wall, which I must plant willow &c in to make it sufficient, would be a suffient purchase for it, with a small acknowledgement to your Grace. It is true there is a large track of land – but it is wild & out, far on the mountain, & your Grace will perceive by the plan that the south side is all along stony & rocky, & the north side quite wet & swampy – I take the freedome, my Lord, to be this particular in the description of this place that what I have offer’d, & fix’d on by your Graces stewards may meet with your approbation. I propose taking in two enclosures on each side for planting in, & set this so much wanted improvement forward, & that others may catch from the example, & go with it – I am likewise greatly oblig’d to your Grace for the delicate manner you vouchsafe to condescend to lay before your stewards your sentiments about my being game keeper which I readily accepted of, & they have drawn out of me a deputation in which they signify that it is by your Graces appointment. – It is a place that a good deal of trouble & some expence will attend, & have always been executed by men of general repute ; so for my part I shall let nothing be wanting to keep up that dignity & respect that is due to you, my good Lord, & to the honor & memory of your noble family, to whom my heart is warmly attached.
    I have some thoughts of building a small lodge in some commodious place on the top of the mountain, where I shall yearly invite some of the principle people of this Island to meet me, & have the pleasure to drink your Graces, my Lady Dutchess’s & your noble familys health, & propserity
    I am My Lord your Graces most oblig’d & most obedt humbl servt
    John Lewhellin
    Ramsey 24th June 1768
    PS as the season is farr advanced it will be conferring a great obligation on me if your Grace will please to confirm the licence & give speedy notice to your stewards that I may begin.

    2. [From Atholl Papers – AP 36/38(2nd)-27]
    [Letter from John Lewhellin to Duke of Atholl, 11 March 1770]
    My Lord
    Were it not for your Graces goodness & humanity I should be confounded to approach you, Sir, with this my letter which is humbly to implore your Graces aid and interest to obtain for me the place of comptrowler of the customs in this town now void by the death of the late Fisher Jackson who expired last night. It would, my Lord, along with what I otherwise possess make a handsome & easie provision for my large family, & help to attone for the great loss I sustain’d by the change of affairs here – and it would, my Lord, along with your kindness done me, for ever oblige me, & keep my heart full of the warmest gratitude to your Grace. – I presume that your Graces great weight & consequence in the world cannot fail of succeeding, if you will please to deign to hearken to me, & intercede in my behalf. you will perceive my Lord I am no Roman Chatholick – I do not apply fortutelar intercession I apply myself, at once, when a considderation with your Grace will, I know, be better than a thousand appologies for my freedome:- as your Grace I am persuaded will do me the justice to believe I do not do it out of anoyance or presumption. If it be any objection that I live here – I was born in Bristol & am descended from an ancient race of Brittons (you know my Lord a welchman will even go to Adam & to Eve to find one an ancient pedigree) and am well qualified to serve his Majesty in the capacity I request. – And which I hope I shall find favour in your Graces sight to get me fixd in.
    For a long time past I could hardly refrain from taking the freedome to write to your Grace & return your thanks for granting me the common I apply’d for – I am, with all the assiduity I can, carrying on the inclosure, & am now planting a considerable number of Willows where there is no possibility of erecting a stone hedge upon acct of the swampyness of the ground and it will otherwise be impossible for me to make out the boundary in a direct manner according to the plan on acct of the badness of some places & the inconveniency thereof, but it shall be done as near as possible, & laid before your Grace, & what little variation there will be, I believe will be to the advantage of your Grace.- I am likewise preparing to adventure a plantation on each side of the mountain for which end I am already furnished with a pretty large number of ash and fir trees, but I propose planting many other sorts – I purpose makeing two different parks, one haveing already three turf roads thro it, to avoid having any on the other & I purpose calling one of them Mount Athol. & the other some like name that will perpetuate my gratitude & attachment to your Grace & noble family, if I do not presume in so doing. It will give me great pleasure to accomplish the plantation, because thereby, if it thrives, people will perceive the utility of your Graces common as well as the great benefit that will arise from such improvements to this Island. – I have for some time purpos’d doing myself the honour of waiting on your Grace at Dunkeld when I should have the happiness in person of acquainting your Grace with these things, & throwing my self at your Graces feet. – I find I have gone out of the common road of conciseness in addressing so great a superior – but my good Lord you will please to excuse me for it & attribute it to the fountain from which it tra (blot) and after all I have said I cannot conclude without once more begging your Lordships excuse for the freedom I have taken being with the highest & most profound respect
    I am My Lord your Graces most oblig’d & most obedt humbl servt
    John Lewhellin
    Ramsey 11th March 1770

    From the letters we can see that Llewellyn was originally from Bristol but engaged in the island’s ‘free trading’ or smuggling economy until the island was revested in the crown to end this in 1765.
    Recent research by island historian Nigel Crowe in Whitehaven Records Office, and discussed in the recently published book on Milntown by David Winterbotham, has revealed that Llewellyn had been granted the tenancy of the Christian family’s historic Milntown estate near Ramsey in 1759 on condition that he demolished the old, rambling Tudor house and built a new Georgian house close by. He had to incorporate sash windows of the kind and dimensions of those in the Christians’ Cumberland home of Ewanrigg/Unerigg near Maryport, and also keep a room available for the use of members of the Christian family when they needed to visit the island.
    It seems from an original letter recently being offered for sale on the internet by an antiques dealer that in 1777 John Christian VII (later John Christian Curwen), who was living in Castletown at that time and had recently married Margaret Taubman (daughter of Keys Speaker and merchant John Taubman snr of the Bowling Green, Castletown, and sister of Captain John Taubman jnr of the Nunnery, Douglas)bconsidered ending Llewellyn’s 21-year lease of Milntown early so he and his wife could go and live there. However, he was dissuaded from doing so on the advice of his guardian and uncle Henry Curwen of Workington Hall (John being not yet 21 years old and so technically was still a minor) and then by the death of Margaret while still a new mother of their young son (also named John Christian) in Peel in 1778. Margaret is buried in Kirk Malew churchyard, and John Christian VII, after undertaking a Grand Tour of Europe in 1779-81, including studying at the Scots College at Douai in Flanders and visiting Germany, Switzerland and Austria, married his wealthy cousin Isabella Curwen (Henry Curwen’s heiress) by elopement to Edinburgh, and then subsequent renewal of vows in London, in 1782.
    By that time John Llewellyn was making a will through being ‘weak in mind and body’, a will that mentions the intack estate we now known as Park Llewellyn but then known as Mount Atholl as follows (the will is also interesting because it notes warehouses on the Mooragh, a garden at Ballastowell outside Ramsey, and an annual donation to the poor being made because in the past John Llewellyn’s home in Ramsey itself had been ‘blown up by powder’ ie gunpowder in an accidental explosion:

    Episcopal Will Maughold (#1) 1782 John Lewhellin [Llewellyn]
    (from GL721)

    In the name of God amen

    I John Lewhellin of the Town of Ramsay merchant being sick and weak in body, but of sound and perfect mind memory and understanding (praised be God for the same) and considering and calling to mind the uncertainty of this mortal life do therefore make publish & declare this my last will & testament in manner and form following

    First

    I commit my soul to God and my body to a christian burial hpoing thro the merits of my Blessed Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ for a joyfull resurrection and a full and free pardon of all my sins.

    Secondly

    I leave and bequeath to my daughter Jane Durie the sum of forty pounds, as legacy in consideration of the goods she sent to my son John Thomas Llewillen, then in the Island of Dominica in the West Indies to be disposed of by him for her account, but he died there and she never received any payment for said goods

    Item I leave and bequeath to my daughter Mary McWhanel the sum of twenty shillings as legacy

    Item I leave and bequeath to my daughter Margaret Llewellin the sum of twenty shillings as legacy

    Item I leave and bequeath to my daughter Catherin Llewellin the yearly interest of the sum of one hundred pounds at the rate of five @cent per annum which is five pounds @ year during her natural life and no longer. And in case she marries to pay the sum of one hundred pounds at the end of one year from the date of her sd marriage in lieu and consideration of this legacy of five pounds @ annum.

    Itm I leave and bequeath to my daughter Elizabeth Frissell the sum of five pounds as legacy.

    Item I leave and bequeath to my daughter Isable Christian Llewillin the yearly interest of the sum of one hundred pounds at the rate of five per cent per annum which is five pounds year during her natural life and no longer. And in case she marries to pay the sum of one hundred pounds at the end of one year from the date of her said marriage in lieu and consideration of said legacy of five pounds per annum.

    Item I leave and bequeath settle estate & confirm unto & upon my eldest son William Llewillin my present dwelling house out houses yard cellars & offices thereunto appertaining situate on the Mooragh in the town of Ramsey of the annual chief or Lords rent of one shilling and nine pence or thereabouts and also a certain plott or parcel of ground part of Ballastowell quarterland now my garden near said town and some time ago purchased from William Wattleworth and Margaret his wife.

    Item I do further leave and bequeath, settle, estate and confirm unto & upon my said eldest son William Llewillin, and unto and upon my son Nicholas Llewillin, equally and share alike all and singular my parcell of intackland situate in the parishes of Maughold & Lezaire commonly called and known by the name of Mount Atholl of the annual chief or Lords rent of one pounds & ten shillings or there abouts and the three fifths part of a certain intack rent in said parish of Maughold called Coan Moar adjoining to Mount Atholl aforesaid, some time ago purchased from Ewan Kerruish of Cardell Moar and Thomas Fargher of Ballafaile both of Maughold parish and Mr Thomas Allen of Ballavarrey KK Andrews being of the annual Lords rent of four shillings & three pence or thereabouts And also certain build lately called Reeves’s warehouse of the Lords rent of four pence or thereabouts together with the whole concerns formerly Willy Moars of about for pence Lords rent and one moity of the concerns of five pence rent formerly the Revd John Allens property severally in the town of Ramsey and a brass rent of threepence thereunto appertaining and likewise a lott of ground of four shillings and one penny rent part of a parcel of quarterland in the parish of Lezaire called BallaClaghbane, or Reast Moar, together with another parcel of lands in the said parish called Rushey Close or closes of three shillings rent, and also another parcel of land called Close ey-Nargid or Close Meannagh (in or adjoining to Mullenlawn in the parish of KK Andrews) lately purchased from John Kelvin & Leonora his wife of the town of Ramsey and bearing the annual chief or Lords rent of seven pence half penny together with all ways, water and watercourses, streets, lanes, easements libertys, profitts & advantages to the several and respective houses lands, messuages tenaments and premises belonging, or in any wise appertaining to the rents of the said respective lands & premises more or less than as aforesaid. Yielding & paying yearly and every year the annual chief or Lords rent aforesaid or such as may be necessary to be settled by their proper setting quest on all or any of the houses lands messuages tenements & premises aforesaid together with all other dues and duties to which the same and or may be liable and subject & the times & seasons usually accustomed. And that no division ,separation or partition wall, hedge or fence is or are to be built or erected in Mount Atholl by and between my said two sons, namely William Llewillin & Nicholas Llewillin or their successors but the same to be held in common between them unless by the mutual consent of the parties and their successors. And whereas for these years by past since my house was blown up by powder I have distributed yearly & every year, on the twelfth day of May to the poor of the town of Ramsey the sum of five shillings as a token of God Almightys preservation of me and my child on that day. I do therefore recommend and earnestly require that the said sum of five shillings per annum be paid or distributed on the sd twelfth day of May as aforesaid by my said two sons William Llewillin & Nicholas Llewillin and their successors hereafter.

    Lastly I nominate constitute and appoint my said two sons namely William Llewillin & Nicholas Llewillin joint and co executers and residuary legatees, of all the rest residue and remainder of all and singular my goods cattles, chattles, credits, bonds notes & effects both real & personal, or of what kind or nature or denomination so ever. And I do by these presents annihilate, revoke and make void all former wills or wrtings made to the contrary of this my last will & testament in testimony whereof I have hereunto subscribed my name and affixed my seal the sixth day of May in the year of our Lord one thousand seven hundred & eighty two

    John Lewhillin

    Signed, sealed, published & declared by the testator John Lewhellin as & for his last will and testament in the presence of us, who at his request and in his presence, and in the presence of each other have subscribed our names as witnesses thereunto

    John Sayle John Wattleworth Wm Killip – Jurati
    Isabill Christian my mark X

    At a chapter court holden at Lezayre June 13th 1782

    The Excrs are sworn in court in forme of law & also to be true & just the one to the other in the division of the effects & have given pledges for the payment of debts & legacies namely John Sayle & John Wattleworth both of Ramsey

    Probatum est

    Chas Crebbin Wm Clucas

    sol ?

    1784 July 6th James Moore a transmarine claims agt the estate of John Lewhillin for £250:0:0

    1785 8 June Geo Maxwell esq a transmarine by Alexander Laurie claims for £200 Brit

    John Llewellyn evidently died by 1784, because in that year his widow made a will, again mentioning ‘Mount Atholl’ (ie Park Llewellyn) and stating that by that time the family lived in the Mooragh property. She also wanted to be buried with her first husband, the Rev Allen, and not with her second, John Llewellyn:

    Archdeacon Wills 1784 #165, Maughold, of Jane Corlet widow of Captain John Llewellyn & of Revd John Allen:

    “I Jane Lewhellin widow and relict of Mr. John Lewhellin of the town of Ramsey late deceased being in my declining condition but by the blessing of the Almighty God of sound mind, memory, and understanding and considering and calling to mind the uncertainty of this mortal life, do therefore make publish and declare this my last will and testament in manner and form following.
    FIRST, I commend my soul to God and my body to a Christian burial in the grave of my FORMER HUSBAND THE REVD. MR. JOHN ALLEN in the Parish Churchyard of Kk Maughold, hoping for a full and free pardon of all my sins and a joyful resurrection through the merits and mediation of Jesus Christ my ever blessed Lord, Saviour and Redeemer. And as to my worldly concerns I dispose of them as hereafter mentioned and specified. AND TO MY SON WILLIAM LEWHELLIN, who is now abroad, I devise, leave and bequeath my part of the dwelling house wherein I live, with my part of the our houses buildings, cellars, yard, offices, easements, liberties, conveniences and appurtenances thereunto belonging situated on the Mooraugh in the said town of Ramsey of the annual chief or lord’s rent of one shilling and nine pence or thereabouts in the whole together with my part of the garden made on that parcel of ground part of Ballastole’s quarterland situated near the said town, which said parcel of ground was purchased by my late deceased husband Mr Lewhellin from WILLIAM WATTLEWORTH and MARGARET HIS WIFE some time ago, that is in case he my said son William comes home, and have lawful issue to enjoy the same. But in case he my said son William doth not come home and have no lawful issue as aforesaid, then and in that case my will is that all the before mentioned premises shall fall and descend to my SON NICHOLAS LEWHELLIN. But in case he my said son Nicholas dies without lawful issue to enjoy the same, then and in that case by virtue of this my will all the premises aforesaid shall fall and descend to my DAUGHTER ELIZABETH THE WIFE OF JOHN FRISSEL, ESQUIRE, and the same to be absolutely in her own power to dispose thereof to whom she will at her own discretion. But in case the premises aforesaid do not fall or descend to my said daughter Mrs. Frissell, then and in that case I do hereby order and appoint for her the sum of one hundred pounds British, and for which said sum of one hundred pounds the premises aforesaid are to stand continue and remain as a firm security until the event in that respect be known or the said sum be fully paid unto her the said Mrs. Frissell or her executors or assigns or to whomsoever she in her own sole discretion will think proper to order or appoint the same.
    ITEM, I do devise leave and bequeath to my said two SONS WILLIAM and NICHOLAS LEWHELLIN equally between my part of that house in the said town commonly called Reeves’ Warehouse of four pence yearly lord’s rent and the easements and liberties thereunto belonging, and all my part of those lands in the mountain situated in the parishes of KK Maughold and Lezayre commonly called Mount Atholl of one pound and ten shillings yearly lord’s rent or thereabouts which my said late deceased husband Mr. John Lewhellin took to rent, together with my part of a certain parcel of intack in the said parish of Kk Maughold called the Coan Moor adjoining Mount Atholl aforesaid of the annual lord’s rent of four shillings and three pence or thereabouts some time ago purchased by my late deceased husband Mr. Lewhellin from EWAN KERRUISH of Cardale Moar and THOMAS FARGHER of Ballafayle both of KK Maughold and Mr. THOMAS ALLEN of Ballavarry in KK Andreas . . . my said two sons William and Nicholas Lewhellin . . . to pay the annuities or yearly sums hereafter mentioned to others of my children, that is to say, to pay the sum of ten pounds British yearly to my SON EDWARD ALLEN during his natural lifetime, and ten pounds British yearly to my DAUGHTER MARGARET LEWHELLIN during her natural lifetime, and to pay fifteen pounds British yearly to my DAUGHTER CATHARINE LEWELLIN during her natural life time, and five pounds British yearly to my DAUGHTER MRS. MARY MCWHONNELL during her lifetime . . .
    ITEM, to my DAUGHTER MRS. DURIE, I leave five guineas as a legacy.
    ITEM, I do hereby devise, leave and bequeath to my said two sons William and Nicholas Lewhellin equally between them my right of a lot of ground of four shillings and one half penny, being part of a parcel of quarterland in the parish of Lezayre called Balne-Claughbane or Reast Moar . . . And I do further order and appoint that several annuities by me left and bequeathed to my SON EDWARD ALLEN and my three DAUGHTERS namely MARGARET and CATHERINE LEWELLIN and MARY MCWHONNELL as aforementioned be paid to them respectively quarterly or in four equal proportions in every years as the same shall become due during their respective natural lives as aforementioned.
    ITEM, to my DAUGHTER ISABEL LEWHELLIN I do leave and bequeath the sum of one hundred pounds British, and the same to be paid to her as soon as her situation may require after my decease.
    ITEM to my SON WILLIAM LEWHELLIN I leave my part of the clock and tea kitchen and the Bible, which are to remain in the house and the same to fall and descend in the same manner as the house is to go,as is herein by me before ordered and directed.
    ITEM, I leave all the linens and all my clothes and apparel equally between my three DAUGHTERS MARGARET, CATHERINE and ISABEL, I leave all my household effects . . . I also leave to CATHERINE the use and benefit of a pear looking glass during her lifetime, and after her decease the same to be the right and due of HER SISTER MRS. FRISSELL. . . .
    ITEM to my SON EDWARD ALLEN I devise, leave and bequeath all my part of those houses in the said town that were built by HIS FATHER THE REVD. MR. JOHN ALLEN (MY FORMER HUSBAND) together also with my part of those houses in the said town walled Willy Moar’s houses with the gardens and all easements . . . and I do order and direct that in case he my said SON EDWARD shall happen to die before HIS PRESENT WIFE that then and in that case my part of those houses called Willy Moar’s houses . . shall fall and descend to my SON NICHOLAS LEWHELLIN.
    ITEM I leave for the use and benefit of the poor of Ramsey the sum of five pounds British . . . I do order and appoint that my part of the wool shall be sold to my NEPHEW MR. JOHN SAYLE for the use of my two DAUGHTERS MARGARET and CATHERINE and also for the use of my SON EDWARD equally between them . . . And whereas my two SONS WILLIAM and NICHOLAS LEWHELLIN as executors of the last will and testament of THEIR FATHER MR. JOHN LEWHELLIN (MY LATE HUSBAND) have not given me any justice in the division of the goods and effects, I do therefore order and appoint that they may be brought to justice in that respect and render a just and particular account of the same, and those upon whatsoever will appear to be due to me from them, I do hereby leave and bequeath the same to be equally between my three DAUGHTERS MARGARET, CATHERINE, and ISABEL. . . . And whereas the houses in this my will before mentioned and by me devised and bequeathed to my SON EDWARD ALLEN fell into decay in the lifetime of my LATE HUSBAND MR. JOHN LEWHELLIN, therefore as satisfaction to him my said son Edward and to enable him on his part to make up the deficiencies in the said houses, I have by my promissory note bearing date the 3rd of this instant month of March 1784, on account of his my said son Edward’s creditors promised to pay MR. JAMES OATES of Oatland or order the sum of thirty-eight pounds fourteen shillings and ten pence British, which said sum is to be appropriated by the said Mr. Oates for the purpose of paying and discharging my said son Edward’s debts . . . And all my reading books I leave to be equally between my four DAUGHTERS MRS. FRISSELL, MARGARET, CATHERINE, and ISABEL . . . And as consistent to my own knowledge he my said SON EDWARD ALLEN did not get satisfaction for the goods of HIS FATHER THE REVD. JOHN ALLEN (MY FORMER HUSBAND) which goods were in my hands and in the hands of my LATE HUSBAND MR. JOHN LEWHELLIN, nor for the price of a parcel of lands which he sold to my said late husband, now in order to settle peace and quietness between them my said son Edward Allen and my other two sons William and Nicholas Lewhellin, I do hereby enjoin my said son Edward Allen that he will not go to law with them my two sons aforementioned for or on account of the matters aforesaid. And in case my said two sons William and Nicholas Lewhellin do go to law with him my said son Edward Allen for any manner or cause or upon any account under any pretence whatsoever, particularly for the sum of twenty pounds that I gave to him which said sum of twenty pounds was a gift designed for him by HIS AUNT MRS. CATHERINE CURGHEY deceased, but as he happened to be abroad the same was entrusted to me to pay to him and which accordingly I did out of the consideration money of a deed of assignment which RICHARD ALLEN and I gave to ISABEL SAYLE of the town of Ramsey, then and in that case I do hereby enjoin, order and appoint them my said two sons William and Nicholas to pay the further sum of Three hundred pounds British to him my said son Edward Allen and the said houses, buildings, yard, garden, lands and premises in this my will before mentioned and devised to my said two sons to stand, continue, and remain as security for the payment thereof . . . And I, having considered the condition and circumstances of MARTHA ALLEN, do therefore leave her twenty shillings yearly during her natural lifetime and the same to be paid to her and of my part of the deed of gift I had from MRS. CURGHEY. And as I do sincerely repose confidence in the sincerity of the REVD. MR. THOMAS CUBBON Vicar of the Parish of KK Maughold and CAPTAIN DANIEL CALLOW now of Castletown, gentleman, and my NEPHEW MR. JOHN SAYLE of the town of Ramsey, I do therefore nominate and appoint them as trustees to have this my will put in full execution that all my children may have the full benefit thereof according to my real intention or according to the tenor, purport and full meaning of the expressed words of the same, and they the said gentlemen to be paid for all their trouble occasioned on that account. And I do wish that my SON IN LAW JOHN FRISSELL Esquire would be kindly pleased to be aiding my daughters in their defenseless condition and to see that they should not be sufferers of oppression. And to the witnesses of this my will I leave five English shillings a piece for their trouble on this account. And to my DAUGHTER CATHERINE I do further leave order and appoint the use and benefit of two rooms in part of the dwelling house during her natural life . . .
    Lastly, I do hereby nominate, constitute, ordain, and appoint my two SONS WILLIAM LEWHELLIN AND NICHOLAS LEWHELLIN joint executors of this my last will and testament. In witness of all which I have hereunto subscribed my name and affixed my seal this 16th of March 1784. [signed] Jane Lewhellin.

    Witnesses: Willim Killip, Nicholas Curphey junior.

    AT A CONSISTORY COURT holden at KK Michael on the 28th day of January 1784, the executors are sworn in court in form of law as also to be true and just to each other in the division of the residuum of the effects . . .”

    Another document in the Atholl Papers from 1812 has the 4th Duke of Atholl talking about the Major (formerly Captain) Taubman, (John Christian) Curwen, John Christian (son of John VII and Margaret Taubman) and Llewellyn (a son) as MHKs and office holders in the island to the British Government in not very flattering terms:

    Private Memorandum read to Lord Sidmouth respecting his expression of “Respectable Inhabitants” connected with the Atty Genl & Lieut Governor
    I am unwilling to make public representation upon private characters unless compelled to do so but an expression which fell from your Lordship in our conversation of [erased] in which you mentioned a wish to consult the respectable inhabitants of the Island could not escape my attention. I shall without fear of contradiction and prove it publickly if necessary that all the respectable inhabitants of the Isle of Man act in unison with myself. That my opponents who assume to themselves that character consist of a few individuals whose situation I will shortly state.
    Major Taubman is the nominal Speaker of the House of Keys tho he is now generally absent from the Island – He is the son of the Taubman whose extensive smuggling transactions were the principal means of my family being deprived of their rights in the Island – He held at the revestment a great quantity of spirits teas wines &c deposited in the Island for the purpose of smuggling to England which was prevented by the revesting act and the duties upon which to the amount of five hundred pounds he never paid but which from the state of the Island for many years after that period became the principal source of supply to the Island at great prices and therefore realized a considerable fortune to the proprietor which added to some fortunate purchases at a time when the Island was supposed to be ruined has produced to the present Major Taubman a considerable property.
    Mr Curwen and his son Mr Christian are also in the Keys whose name I need only mention to prove that we are not likely to coalesce in private or political opinion.
    Mr Fitzsimmons introduced into the House of Keys by Col Smelt the Lieutenant Governor – he is a clergyman who has dropt the clerical character. He was arrested and his papers seized on suspicion of treasonable and seditious practices but was not tried on that charge but was afterwards tried convicted and imprisoned at Edinburgh for aiding French Prisoners to escape and is now become one of the respectable Inhabitants of the Isle of Man.
    John Lewellyn [Llewellyn] later secretary of the Lieut Governor and by him chosen a Key in September last [1812] to support his interest possessed of very little property and held in no respect in the Island.
    These persons act in conjunction with the Lieutenant Governor who has given year after year leave of absence to the attorney general [William Frankland – related to Smelt via marriage] for the purpose of securing his cooperation in keeping up the impression here that it is necessary that the proceedings of the government should be watched – and who has therefore naturally supported the Lieutenant Governor and become a resident agent for those who are thwarting his Majesty’s government and the best interests of the Island instead of attending to the personal performance of his duty in it.

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