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I had a lovely walk around Lonan today and come across this secret wood which was lit up buy Bluebells and Whitebells.

This image was captured on my Fuji X10 camera resized and cropped in Adobe Photoshop CS5

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A Bluebell and Whitebell Wood in Lonan - © Peter Killey

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Grabbed this shot yesterday afternoon of a very cold Ramsey Beach overlooking the two piers and the sandy coastline of Bride which runs up to the Point of Ayre.

The image was captured on my Fuji X10 camera dipped in HDR 5, resized and cropped in Adobe Photoshop CS5

Click on the image for a larger view – Feel free to make any comments either on here by clicking the “Write comment” below or by logging onto my Facebook page www.facebook.com/manxscenes

Ramsey Beach and Piers and the Bride Coastline - © Peter Killey

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Grabbed this shot yesterday afternoon of a very cold Ramsey Beach overlooking the two piers and the sandy coastline of Bride which runs up to the Point of Ayre.

The image was captured on my Fuji X10 camera dipped in HDR 5, resized and cropped in Adobe Photoshop CS5

Click on the image for a larger view – Feel free to make any comments either on here by clicking the “Write comment” below or by logging onto my Facebook page www.facebook.com/manxscenes

Ramsey Beach and Piers and the Bride Coastline - © Peter Killey

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Two pictures from Ballacraine in St Johns;

First image is the former Ballacraine Public House, now in private ownership and famous for the entry into the pub on his motorbike of George Formby in the TT film “No Limit”

Click on any of the images for a larger view.

The Former Ballacraine Pub at St Johns - © Peter Killey

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The second image shows the colourful Ballacraine Farm which is always so brightly decorated and really depicts a true Manx Farm Cottage.

Ballacraine Farm at St Johns - © Peter Killey

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Both of the above images were captured on my Fuji X10 camera resized and cropped in Adobe Photoshop CS5

Feel free to make any comments either on this website by clicking the “Write comment” below or by logging onto my Facebook page www.facebook.com/manxscenes

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Are you starting out in digital photography? If you are, then here are a list of pointers pertaining to digital photography basics. These pointers will give your digital images a massive kick start in terms of quality and it doesn’t matter what camera you have. You can take good photographs with any digital SLR camera.

So here’s my advice:

1. Don’t be concerned with the number of megapixels of your camera. The number of pixels determines how big you’ll be able to print your photographs. Yes it’s true that the more pixels you have, the more refined detail your images will have but at this stage you want to start shooting as many photographs as you possibly can. You’ll learn so much through every photograph.

2. Set your camera’s ISO speed to the lowest possible setting. This will give a smooth transition to your photographs and make them less grainy than at higher ISO settings.

3. When you are shooting portraits, use large apertures that are wide open. This means that the f-number should be as small as possible. The smaller the f-number, the larger the aperture. Why is it a good idea to use large apertures when photographing human subjects? Large apertures blur out the background and bring the subject into sharp focus bringing the viewer’s attention right where you want it.

4. Pay attention to the background – try to eliminate clutter that doesn’t need to be there. In digital photography, a lot can be done to remove unwanted clutter using software like Adobe Photoshop but there is no harm in doing a little preparation. Perhaps you’ll want your subject to stand in front of a bright plain wall, or colourful patterned curtains. Make your background work with your subject.

5. If you are hand-holding your camera, try not to use a shutter speed slower than 1/60. For example, don’t hand-hold the camera at 1/30. Nice photographs are sharp and in-focus. If you need to use a shutter speed slower than 1/60, use a tripod to ensure sharpness.

6. Use slow shutter speeds to imply motion. Take your digital SLR camera out to an urban environment where there are cars, bicycles and public transport. Set it to shutter priority mode using speeds of 1/30, 1/15, 1/8 and 1/4, follow a moving car or bicycle using the AI Servo focusing drive. Once the moving object is in focus, take the shot. This should blur out the background leaving trails of the subject and imply motion. This technique can take a bit of practice.

7. In your camera’s menu, increase the sharpness and contrast of your “picture style”. Some photographers like to increase the saturation as well, but if you are going to post-process in RGB mode I wouldn’t increase saturation in-camera.

8. Take your landscape images at small apertures like f/16 or even f/22 using a tripod. This will ensure sharp focusing from front-to-back telling a story about your landscape.

9. Pay attention to your camera angle – as a photographer, be prepared to move around. You may have to get down on your knees, even lie down to get down to your subject’s level. Don’t photograph a crawling baby whilst standing… get down to the baby’s level. That’ll evoke more emotions when the photograph is printed and viewed. Get down when shooting landscapes to use your foreground to convey a sense of depth.

10. Don’t forget the rule of thirds – imagine that your viewfinder is split into three thirds both vertically and horizontally. Never place your subject in the centre square or a horizon in the middle. Frame your portraits so that they appear to the right if you are shooting in the landscape orientation, otherwise in the middle if you are using the portrait orientation. For landscape photographs, make sure the horizon line sits on the first or the second horizontal line that divides your viewfinder into three thirds. A horizon line in the middle produces boring landscapes that will do nothing for your viewers.

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I caprtued this image today whilst in Ramsey, it generally depicts Ramsey’s Swing Bridge but if you look at the image you will see a few iconic landmarks from the North of the Isle of Man.

To the left of the image you can see St Pauls apartments which are the highest apartments on the Island, next to it is the beautiful St Paul’s Church.

In the centre of the image you can see Albert Tower which was erected to commemorate the visit to Ramsey of Prince Albert in September 1847, when he randomly walked up that hill on his visit to overview the town.

To the top right of the image you can see the second largest mountain on the island “North Barrule”

This image was captured on my Fuji X10 camera resized and cropped in Adobe Photoshop CS5

Feel free to make any comments either on this website by clicking the “Write comment” below or by logging onto my Facebook page www.facebook.com/manxscenes

Click on the image for a larger view.

Ramsey Swing Bridge Isle of Man - © Peter Killey

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These Manx thatched cottages which overlooks the quaint Niarbyl Bay are probably more famous as the cottages used for the 1998 film Waking Ned Devine  – The left hand cottage was the cottage where Ned Devine died after winning the Irish Lottery 🙂

This image was captured on my Fuji X10 camera resized and cropped in Adobe Photoshop CS5

Feel free to make any comments either on this website by clicking the “Write comment” below or by logging onto my Facebook page www.facebook.com/manxscenes

Click on the image for a larger view.

Niarbyl Cottages - Waking Ned Devine - © Peter Killey

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I spent a pleasurable hour walking around the court of Tynwald the other day during my lunch break.

All of the below images were captured on my Fuji X10 camera resized and cropped in Adobe Photoshop CS5

Feel free to make any comments either on this website by clicking the “Write comment” below or by logging onto my Facebook page www.facebook.com/manxscenes

Click on any of the below images for a larger view.

Images 1 and 2 below;

Depicts the Tynwald Chamber which has been used for sittings since December 1894 and formerly housed the old Weights and Measures office before it became occupied by Tynwald. Also shown is the table which holds the Manx Sword of State which must be present under Tynwald Standing orders before any sitting can take place.

Tynwald Court Isle of Man - © Peter Killey

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tynwald Court Isle of Man - © Peter Killey

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Images 3, 4 and 5 below;

Depicts the Sword of State which is traditionally ascribed to Olaf II , who before he became King is believed to have used it in fighting against the Moors in Spain in 1230. It may really be dated nearer 14th Century.

The Sword has the earliest known depictions of the ‘Three legs of Man’ in its oldest form, and the Legs are depicted on the Pommel and on shields set on either side of the blade where the guard intersects the blade. The sword is present at all sittings of Tynwald and is carried before The Lieutenant Governor at St Johns on Tynwald day.

The Sword is the Island equivalent of the Mace that is used in Westminster, but differs in that it points straight ahead and not left or right as in England which denotes the part in power.

Sword of State Tynwald Court Isle of Man - © Peter Killey

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sword of State Tynwald Court Isle of Man - © Peter Killey

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sword of State Tynwald Court Isle of Man - © Peter Killey

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Image 6 below;

This illustrates the legislative Council Chamber and shows the meeting table. The Council are a revising Chamber and examine in details green bills presented from the House of keys of proposed legislation.

The Legislative Council is presided over by the President and has 10 members indirectly elected by the House of Keys or Ex officio .

Legislative Council Chamber - Isle of Man - © Peter Killey

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

My grateful thanks goes to Tynwald Seneschal Mr Paul Daugherty for his excellent knowledge and advice on every aspect of Tynwald and for supplying to me the above information to go with each of the images.

If you are interested in the Isle of Man and its very unique constitution, have a look at this webpage from manxscenes.com outlining some basic facts about this beautiful island – Click Here 

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A fantastic venue for a photographer to capture images of the many interesting aspects of the Isle of Man in History, this graveyard contains so many interesting graves and tombstones and offers us photographers a fantastic opportunity to capture so many dramatic effects depending on light and weather conditions etc…

This particular image was captured on my Fuji X10 camera resized and cropped in Adobe Photoshop CS5

Feel free to make any comments either on this website by clicking the “Write comment” below or by logging onto my Facebook page www.facebook.com/manxscenes

Click on the image for a larger view.

Kirk Braddan Old Church, Isle of Man - © Peter Killey

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We went to a friends farm in Kirk Michael today to see some lambs being born, unfortunately there was no new arrivals whilst we were there.

Here is an image of twins who are three days old 🙂

The image was captured on my Fuji X10 camera resized and cropped in Adobe Photoshop CS5

Click on the image for a larger view – Feel free to make any comments either on here by clicking the “Write comment” below or by logging onto my Facebook page www.facebook.com/manxscenes

3 Day Old Twins - © Peter Killey

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The magical, mystical, beautiful and truly original Fairy Bridge at Kewaigue, Braddan.

Standing here made me feel like I was not alone, so eerie but so very peaceful…

There are trinkets placed in the wall and flowers all around, and as you can see there is a wreath placed at the top of the arch of the Fairy Bridge.

The below image was captured on my Fuji X10 camera resized and cropped in Adobe Photoshop CS5

Click on the image for a larger view – Feel free to make any comments either on here by clicking the “Write comment” below or by logging onto my Facebook page www.facebook.com/manxscenes

The Real Fairy Bridge - © Peter Killey

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