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These hay bales are ready to be collected together for the winter, the image was taken at Killane in Jurby and the lovely cottage in the background is named Ballateare.

The image was captured on my Nikon D80 SLR with a Nikon 18-135 F3.5/5.6 G AFS DX lens at 50mm and cropped in Adobe Photoshop CS5.

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Killane in Jurby - © Peter Killey

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This little Church in Ballaugh always intrigues me with its leaning entrance pillars, I have heard so many myths about the reasons why the pillars are leaning that I just don’t really know what to believe now! Can anyone enlighten me?

The image was captured on my Nikon D80 SLR with a Nikon 18-135 F3.5/5.6 G AFS DX lens at 18mm and cropped in Adobe Photoshop CS5.

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Ballaugh Old Church - © Peter Killey

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This Manx Tholtan can be seen from the main road in Sulby Valley, it lies at the foot of Ballakerka Plantation and the river runing in front of it is the Sulby River.

The image was captured on my Nikon D80 SLR with a Nikon 18-135 F3.5/5.6 G AFS DX lens at 26mm and cropped in Adobe Photoshop CS5.

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The Sulby River - © Peter Killey

 

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"Christchurch" The Dhoon in Glenmona - © Peter KilleyThis little church that is situated off the main coast road from Laxey to Ramsey at Glenmona is so hidden in the trees that you cannot usually see it as you drive past.

As winter is now virtually upon us and the leaves have relatively dissapeared from the trees, I spotted this little church today and had to picture it!

According to Frances Coakley’s “Manx Notebook” The first foundation stone was laid in June 1854 and the Church was consecrated in Decemeber 1855.

The image was captured on my Nikon D80 SLR with a Nikon 18-135 F3.5/5.6 G AFS DX lens at 18mm and cropped in Adobe Photoshop CS5.

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Captured this image today whilst travelling from Peel to Ramsey of the sandy West coastline of the Island from Kirk Michael up to Jurby Head, with the evidence of coastal erosion quite prominent.

You can also see in the top left of the image the white spire of Jurby Church.

The image was captured on my Nikon D80 SLR with a Nikon 18-135 F3.5/5.6 G AFS DX lens at 90mm and cropped in Adobe Photoshop CS5.

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The sandy West Coast of the Isle of Man - © Peter Killey

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RIP Steve Jobs - 1955 - 2011Steve Jobs, billionaire co-founder of Apple and the mastermind behind an empire of products that revolutionised computing, telephony and the music industry, has died in California at the age of 56.

Jobs stepped down in August as chief executive of the company he helped set up in 1976, citing illness. He had been battling an unusual form of pancreatic cancer, and had received a liver transplant in 2009.

Jobs wrote in his letter of resignation: “I have always said if there ever came a day when I could no longer meet my duties and expectations as Apple’s CEO, I would be the first to let you know. Unfortunately, that day has come.”

Apple released a statement paying tribute: “Steve’s brilliance, passion and energy were the source of countless innovations that enrich and improve all of our lives … The world is immeasurably better because of Steve.”

Bill Gates, the former chief executive of Microsoft, said in a statement that he was “truly saddened to learn of Steve Jobs’s death”. He added: “The world rarely sees someone who has had the profound impact Steve has had, the effects of which will be felt for many generations to come.

“For those of us lucky enough to get to work with him, it’s been an insanely great honour. I will miss Steve immensely.”

He is survived by his wife, Laurene, and four children. In a statement his family said Jobs “died peacefully today surrounded by his family … We know many of you will mourn with us, and we ask that you respect our privacy during our time of grief”.

Jobs was one of the pioneers of Silicon Valley and helped establish the region’s claim as the global centre of technology. He founded Apple with his childhood friend Steve Wozniak, and the two marketed what was considered the world’s first personal computer, the Apple II.

He was ousted in a bitter boardroom battle in 1985, a move that he later claimed was the best thing that could have happened to him. Jobs went on to buy Pixar, the company behind some of the biggest animated hits in cinema history including Toy Story, Cars and Finding Nemo.

He returned to Apple 11 years later when it was being written off by rivals. What followed was one of the most remarkable comebacks in business history.

Apple was briefly the most valuable company in the world earlier this year, knocking oil giant Exxon Mobil off the top spot. The company produces $65.2bn a year in revenue compared with $7.1bn in its business year ending September 1997.

Starting with his brightly coloured iMacs, Jobs went on to launch hit after hit transformed personal computing.

Then came the success of the iPod, which revolutionised the music industry, leading to a collapse in CD sales and making Jobs one of the most powerful voices in an industry he loved.

His firm was named in homage to the Beatles’ record label, Apple. But the borrowing was permitted on the basis that the computing firm would stay out of music. After the success of the iPod the two Apples became engaged in a lengthy legal battle which finally ended last year when the Beatles allowed iTunes to start selling their back catalogue.

Jobs’s remarkable capacity to spot what people wanted next came without the aid of market research or focus groups.

“For something this complicated, it’s really hard to design products by focus groups,” he once said. “A lot of times, people don’t know what they want until you show it to them.”

Jobs initially hid his illness but his startling weight loss started to unnerve his investors. He took a six-month medical leave of absence in 2009, during which he received a liver transplant, and another medical leave of absence in mid-January before stepping down as chief executive in August.

Jobs leaves an estimated $8.3bn, but he often dismissed others’ interest in his wealth. “Being the richest man in the cemetery doesn’t matter to me … Going to bed at night saying we’ve done something wonderful … that’s what matters to me.”

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I am so jealous today, Nick took Ted down to Douglas Beach for the first time ever, Ted and Nick or Nick and Ted 🙂 loved it, Ted was running wild and even ran into the sea right up to his neck and spent an hour after that running wild, I just wish I was off work to have been with them! Never mind I am off this coming Friday until next Tuesday so hopefully we can take Ted down there again, happy days 🙂

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Well its been over four weeks since I last posted an update about Ted the Border Terrier Terrorist pup, Ted is now 17 weeks old and is growing in age, cockiness and character every single day.

Ted absolutely loves going out for a walk with Nick and I, he gets so excited and even though he is still small with small legs he will walk for ever, in fact Nick and I have found when we return home after a massive walk, we are knackered but Ted is just started, he is a bit hyper!! 🙂

We took Ted for a walk on the boards above Clypse Reservoir on Friday 23rd September and he loved it, we can let him off his lead and he stays close by, he even comes straight back as soon as we call his name.

We love little Ted (sometimes!) and he has made such a lovely pet.

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Ted and Nick on the 23rd Sep 2011 above Clypse Reservoir...

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Whilst we were out for a walk around the Clypse and Kerrowdhoo reservoirs over the weekend I captured these guys doing a bit of fly fishing, as you can see by the image there is a definite Autumnal feeling as the fly fishing season must be coming to an end.

The Clypse Reservoir is the upper of the two reservoirs in the Groudle valley and impounds the upper reaches of the Groudle River above Onchan. It was constructed by Douglas Waterworks Company during the period 1875 to 1878 to the designs and under the supervision of Daniel Cregeen, a local engineer.

The image was captured on my Nikon D80 SLR with a Nikon 18-135 F3.5/5.6 G AFS DX lens at 52mm and cropped in Adobe Photoshop CS5.

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Clypse Reservoir Onchan © Peter Killey

 

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