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A 6/7 week old juvenile Peregrine Falcon today, this is 1 of 3 chicks that were born and have now started to fledge the scrape, you can just make out the down on it’s head 🙂

It has been an absolute honour and a pleasure watching these beautiful Raptors fledge.

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Juvenile Peregrine Falcon - © Peter Killey - www.manxscenes.com

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How lucky we are 🙂

Standing high up at Druidale, extreme left of the image is North Barrule then to the right Clagh Ouyr, Snaefell Mountain is in the middle of the image and you can make out Sulby Reservoir to the right. The trees in the foreground are at Tholt y Will Plantation.

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Snaefell Mountain - © Peter Killey - www.manxscenes.com

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The Raven is a bird of legend and superstition and there are a number of places on the Island which include Raven in their names. The Island has a strong Viking element in its history and Odin, the Norse God, was, according to mythology, accompanied by two Ravens. During the Millennium Year of 1979, a replica of a Viking longship was sailed from Norway to the Isle of Man by a mixed Norwegian and Manx crew. The longship, which is now preserved on the Island, is called “Odin’s Raven”.

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The Raven © Peter Killey - www.manxscenes.com

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The White Lady of Ballafreer

A peculiar rock of white quartz which has a human look about it. It is about six to seven feet high and is reputed to bring good fortune to young brides!

As you know the Isle of Man is full of history, myths and legends and lots of the stories have been handed down by oral tradition and it is difficult to find any record of them in print.

*Update from Bernadette Weyde from her excellent FB Page “As Manx as the Hills”

Extract from William Cubbon’s book, Island Heritage:

“The White Lady of Ballafreer has been an object of reverence, of wonderment, of admonition and of fear for many centuries. In view of the fact that Ballafreer was reckoned holy ground – the genesis of the name is ‘ the home of the brethren ‘ – it may have had a blessed significance, there was certainly a belief that it shed especial protection over women folk.

There is nothing elsewhere in the Island like this white quartz pillar, about six to seven feet high. A girl about to be wed would fill her mouth with the water from Chibbyr Pherick, ‘St. Patrick’s well,’ which flowed only a few yards away. Then she would walk three times around the pillar, and this must be done jesh-wise, or sun-wise, and then swallow the sacred water, saying in Manx: Ayns yn Ennym Yee, as y Vac, as y Spyrryd Noo,’ In the Name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Ghost.’ Child-bearing women also did this ritual. And, in order to be effective, it must be performed before sunrising.”

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White Lady of Baldafreer © Peter Killey - www.manxscenes.com

White Lady of Baldafreer © Peter Killey - www.manxscenes.com

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The Artania In Douglas Bay today (12/8/15)

With a length of 231 meters she accommodates up to 1,200 passengers and has 9 decks.

What a beautiful day for all her passengers to visit the Isle of Man.

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Artania © Peter Killey - www.manxscenes.com

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