Manxscenes

All posts tagged Manxscenes

The bus, a rare Leyland Comet, registration KMN 519 and new to Douglas Corporation in 1950, it was withdrawn from service in 1968, purchased by builders Parkinsons for staff transport then withdrawn by the company in 1979.

It is seen here after a full restoration by a UK collector outside the Jurby Transport Museum.

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KMN 519 - A Former Douglas Corporation Bus © Peter Killey - www.manxscenes.com

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A bit of a breeze blowing up on Douglas Head this afternoon and I just couldn’t resist this one of the Manannan backing in to her Berth.

Coupled with the Gorgeous WW1 commemorative display of poppies on Douglas Head now in full bloom which is a total credit to Douglas Corporation Gardening Department for such a fantastic display up on Douglas Head.

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Poppies on Douglas Head - © Peter Killey - www.manxscenes.com

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(Manx National Heritage catalogued Cross No. 128)

The transition in the Viking world of Pagan beliefs to the final embrace of Christianity is depicted on this stone. The Vikings brought pagan religion to shores already believing in Christianity and for a short time, both creeds co-existed. But eventually, Christianity won.

One side of this stone shows the Norse god Odin (recognised by the raven on his shoulder, and weaving his famous spear) being devoured by Fenris the wolf at the Battle of Ragnorok – the fight against evil and the end of the world for the Norse deities. The other side is filled with Christian symbolism – a figure with a book and a cross, by a fish and a defeated serpent.

This stone is not only a ‘page-turn’ from pagan to Christian beliefs, it also has that rarest of things – the name of the person who was responsible. Down one side, written in ancient Norse runes, is the inscription ‘Thorwald raised this cross’.

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Thorwald's Cross - © Peter Killey - manxscenes.com

Thorwald’s Cross – Front

Thorwald's Cross - © Peter Killey - manxscenes.com

Thorwald’s Cross – Rear

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Where many Political and local issues are discussed by the male gentry of the Town!

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Spit Corner in Peel © Peter Killey - www.manxscenes.com

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Here is a few of my favourite images from the Southern Agricultural show 2014 which was held at Great Meadow in Malew, the first image is of Peter Quayle of Ballagraingey Farm in St Marks and his eight year old Simmental Bull ‘Pasturefield Turbo Tommy’ who won the show’s top honour of Supreme Champion.

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This Post is for Eleanor and Michael Wasley.

(Manx National Heritage catalogued Cross No. 73)

The most spectacular of all of the crosses in the church yard of St. Adamnan’s, still stands in it’s original position at the south side of the church. It stands at 5 feet high (not over 9 feet as described on many websites!) and more than 3 feet across and has a large equal limbed Celtic wheel head cross that is almost completely covered in interlacing, knot work and plait work designs. This stone dates from the 9th or even the 10th century.

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Celtic Wheel Headed Cross © Peter Killey - www.manxscenes.com

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What a fantastic paint job and artwork finish on this wonderful old Victorian building (the former Belvedere Hotel) on Mooragh Promenade in Ramsey.

Also look at the detail in the slates and the crown on this amazing turret.

The Words above the windows on the turret read; ‘O Ramsey Town Shining by the Sea, Here’s a Health’.…  You know the rest of the song I am sure 🙂

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Mooragh Promenade Ramsey © Peter Killey - www.manxscenes.com

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Both Electric Trams leave Laxey Station, No. 3 is heading off up to the top of Snaefell Mountain and No. 48 is off to Ramsey 🙂

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Laxey Station © Peter Killey - www.manxscenes.com

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This National War Memorial is sited adjacent to Tynwald Hill in St John’s

The Celtic cross memorial was unveiled on 8th November 1923 by the Lieutenant Governor Sir William Fry. It was dedicated by the Lord Bishop of Sodor and Man and it was designed by P.M.C. Kermode and carved by T.H. Royston.

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War Memorial © Peter Killey - www.manxscenes.com

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The largest replica Viking longship ever built is seen here arriving in Peel today. The Dragon Harald Fairhair, hand-built in Norway over a period of two years will spend one night moored on Peel Quayside.

The longship’s length (57ft/35m) is about half the size of a football pitch and it has 25 pairs of oars.

The longship was named after Harald Fairhair, the king who unified Norway.

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Dragon Harald Fairhair © Peter Killey - www.manxscenes.com Dragon Harald Fairhair © Peter Killey - www.manxscenes.com

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Sulby Bridge station opened on the 23rd September 1879 as part of the Manx Northern Railways St John to Ramsey line, it is built in red sandstone which was quarried from Peel.

The station is named after the adjacent Sulby Bridge, and it’s rather isolated position meant that it was not as busy as the nearby Sulby Glen station.

The St John to Ramsey line and all of its stations, including Sulby Bridge station closed completely in 1968.

Railway House is now in private ownership.

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Railway House Sulby © Peter Killey - www.manxscenes.com

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A Snippet of History

In the early morning of May 8th 1888 the hotel suffered a mysterious fire and was subsequently totally destroyed, there was no injury or loss of life as it was empty at the time.

Previously known as the ‘Scottish Tavern’ which dated from the 1790s, the name of the replacement and new hotel came from the locally famous ginger beer that was brewed on the premises.

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* Source – A Sulby Heritage Trail by Juan Vernon

Ginger Hall Hotel © Peter Killey - www.manxscenes.com

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