mine

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Beckwith’s Mine is located above Glen Rushen on the western slopes of South Barrule, The mine was first worked around 1839 and produced lead ore before being closed in 1877. The main shaft was 1,100 feet deep, the bottom of which was considerably below sea level.

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Beckwiths Mine © Peter Killey - www.manxsenes.com

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The site of an old slate quarry workings at the foot of Sartfell Mountain, this old quarry is clearly visible when looking approximately South-East from the TT Course half-way up Barregarrow Hill.

This quarry originally employed about twenty quarrymen, many of whom were Welsh, who came over to the Island following the closures of quarries in their homeland. It closed in about 1874 due to the poor quality of the slate and the buildings subsequently fell into disrepair.

The ruins are those of the blacksmiths shop, stables, a pay office and accommodation for the men.

The belfry at the end of building deceptively gives it the appearance of an old church. In fact, the bell which it once housed was used to signal the beginning and ending of the mens work shifts, which ran day and night.

The old quarry building is very desolate and quite a hard place to get to it has very steep slopes and ravines to cross and a good set of walking boots are a must.

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Glion Kiark - Glen of the Grouse © Peter Killey - manxscenes.com

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This mine was worked circa 1832 to 1881 by the Isle of Man Mining Company, usually in conjunction with the more extensive Beckwith Mine situated 2/3 of a mile West and it exploited part of a vein of lead ore which was temporarily very productive . There were two shafts approximately 240’ apart, the engine shaft and the Whim shaft – So called because it was originally worked with a horse gin or whim.

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Cross Vein Mine in Foxdale © Peter Killey - www.manxscenes.com

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