Marown

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A small group of religious stones which are about half a mile from Marown Old Church (St Runius). They date from 400 to 700 A.D. and bear the sign of the Cross. It is a typical memorial cairn of the Irish type.

The stone setting usually marks a shrine at the burial place of an early Christian saint and no doubt became a preaching place and penitential station.

More popular tradition states that it was from this spot that St. Patrick preached and consequently any person who sits in the ‘chair’ and rests his back against the incised Cross will never feel fatigue.

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St Patricks Chair © Peter Killey - www.manxscenes.com

St Patricks Chair © Peter Killey - www.manxscenes.com

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The Church of Ninian (now always called Trinian) stands beside the Douglas To Peel Road under Greeba Mountain.

It was built in the 12th century on the site of an ancient keeil and extensively altered in the 14th century.  A number of cross slabs are kept inside the ruined church on the site which has no public access.

The ruins are the scene of the story of the Buggane of St Trinian’s who persistently blew off the church roof as fast as it was rebuilt.  The village tailor undertook to make a pair of breeches as soon as the roof had been completed which would then drive the Buggane away.  The tailor was down to the last button but ran out of thread and whilst away the roof was again blown off.

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St Trinian's © Peter Killey - www.manxscenes.com

St Trinian's © Peter Killey - www.manxscenes.com

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Marown Parish is dedicated to St Runius or Ronan (Ma-Ronan) and is the only landlocked parish on the Island. It is thought that originally Marown and Santan were a single parish but the division had occurred by the 14th Century.

Once this was the Parish church and was situated in about the centre of the Parish. The original building was from approximately 1200 AD and was enlarged in 1754 AD (see below image of slate cross above West doorway and inscribed with 1754) by extending the church westwards by about 5m. The original part of the church can still be seen in the eastern half. The original door was in the south wall (behind the now Altar) although blocked off it can still be traced in the outside stonework.

A new door has much earlier moulded door jamb-stones which, according to records in 1778, were retrieved from St. Trinians. At about the same time the stone steps up to the Western gallery were added to house musicians etc.  The door below the gallery entrance has huge flanking stones from a much earlier site.

When the new church on the Main Douglas to Peel road was built in 1860 the old church of St. Runius was used as a mortuary chapel.

The building was restored by volunteer labour and reopened on August 9th 1959. Services are now held during the summer and for all major festivals.

As can be seen by the images there is no mains electricity and this quaint church relies on candle light.

Three bishops are possibly buried here; Lonnan, Connaghan, and Runius.

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St Runius Church Marown © Peter Killey - www.manxscenes.comSt Runius Church Marown © Peter Killey - www.manxscenes.com St Runius Church Marown © Peter Killey - www.manxscenes.comSt Runius Church Marown © Peter Killey - www.manxscenes.comSt Runius Church Marown © Peter Killey - www.manxscenes.com St Runius Church Marown © Peter Killey - www.manxscenes.com

 

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A small group of religious stones which are about half a mile from Marown Old Church (St Runius). They date from 400 to 700 A.D. and bear the sign of the Cross. It is a typical leacht of the Irish type.  The stone setting usually marks a shrine at the burial place of an early Christian saint and no doubt became a preaching place and penitential station.  More popular tradition states that it was from this spot that St. Patrick preached and consequently any person who sits in the ‘chair’ and rests his back against the incised Cross will never feel fatique.

Feel free to make any comments either on this website by clicking the “Write comment” below or by logging onto my Facebook Page enjoy – Click on any of the images for a larger view.

St Patricks Chair Marown © Peter Killey - www.manxscenes.com

St Patricks Chair Marown © Peter Killey - www.manxscenes.com

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Situated half way up the hill on Old Church Road in Crosby, this little old School is now the Department of Education and Children’s Marown Language Centre.

The image was captured on my Nikon S8200 Camera resized and cropped in Adobe Photoshop CS6.

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Old Marown School - The Old School on the Hill -  © Peter Killey

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I have always admired this lovely little property that stands at the foot of Greeba Mountain and which is also closely associated with the Buggane of St Trinian’s Church which is just down the road from this location (I will cover St Trinian’s Church on another post sometime).

The Highlander which has been a Public House since the late 1800’s has now closed it’s doors in April 2012 for the last time.

The image was captured on my Nikon S8200 Camera resized and cropped in Adobe Photoshop CS6

Feel free to make any comments either on this website by clicking the “Write comment” below or by logging onto my Facebook Page enjoy.

Click on the image for a larger view.

The "Highlander" on the main Douglas To Peel Road at Greeba - © Peter Killey

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