Manx Chapel

All posts tagged Manx Chapel

The most isolated of all Manx keeills which stands on a small platform on the steep western sloapes near to the foot of Cronk Ny Arrey Laa.

The original boundaries of the burial ground are almost perfect and just outside the foundation of the priest’s cell.

Several cross slabs and many lintel graves have also been discovered here.

The name Lag Ny Keeilley means “The hollow of the chapel”

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Lag Ny Keeilley © Peter Killey  - www.manxscenes.com

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Marown Parish is dedicated to St Runius or Ronan (Ma-Ronan) and is the only landlocked parish on the Island. It is thought that originally Marown and Santan were a single parish but the division had occurred by the 14th Century.

Once this was the Parish church and was situated in about the centre of the Parish. The original building was from approximately 1200 AD and was enlarged in 1754 AD (see below image of slate cross above West doorway and inscribed with 1754) by extending the church westwards by about 5m. The original part of the church can still be seen in the eastern half. The original door was in the south wall (behind the now Altar) although blocked off it can still be traced in the outside stonework.

A new door has much earlier moulded door jamb-stones which, according to records in 1778, were retrieved from St. Trinians. At about the same time the stone steps up to the Western gallery were added to house musicians etc.  The door below the gallery entrance has huge flanking stones from a much earlier site.

When the new church on the Main Douglas to Peel road was built in 1860 the old church of St. Runius was used as a mortuary chapel.

The building was restored by volunteer labour and reopened on August 9th 1959. Services are now held during the summer and for all major festivals.

As can be seen by the images there is no mains electricity and this quaint church relies on candle light.

Three bishops are possibly buried here; Lonnan, Connaghan, and Runius.

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St Runius Church Marown © Peter Killey - www.manxscenes.comSt Runius Church Marown © Peter Killey - www.manxscenes.com St Runius Church Marown © Peter Killey - www.manxscenes.comSt Runius Church Marown © Peter Killey - www.manxscenes.comSt Runius Church Marown © Peter Killey - www.manxscenes.com St Runius Church Marown © Peter Killey - www.manxscenes.com

 

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Standing inside Old Ballaugh Church at the Cronk and looking out towards the famous leaning entrance pillars.

This little Church always intrigues me with its leaning entrance pillars, I have heard so many myths about the reasons why the pillars are leaning that I just don’t really know what to believe now!

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Ballaugh Old Church at the Cronk © Peter Killey - www.manxscenes.com

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Over the course of time I will add an image and a brief resume of every Church and Chapel on the Isle of Man.

If you have followed my photography website before you will probably know I absolutely love architecture, especially ecclesiastical architecture.

To save you looking through every image on here, just type into the above ‘Search Manxscenes’ box the name of the Church or Chapel you are looking for and if I have captured it, you can view it.

If I have missed a Church or Chapel, just drop me a mail via the Contact page 🙂

The images will be in no particular index and as already stated please make use of the search ‘Search Manxscenes’ box on this website.

Keep checking back at this section from time to time.

Enjoy…

Peter

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