Isle of Man

All posts tagged Isle of Man

Another lovely Sunset tonight at the Celtic Cross War Memorial at Jurby Church.

“At the going down of the sun and in the morning. We will remember them”

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Jurby War Memorial © Peter Killey - www.manxscenes.com

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High up in the hills of Druidale.

There is something quite magical and mystical about these beautiful Hares.

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A Manx Hare © Peter Killey - www.manxscenes.com

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A beautiful Autumnal morning at Salmon Leap at Sulby Claddagh today, I even put my wellies on to take this piccie.

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Salmon Leap in Sulby © Peter Killey - www.manxscenes.com

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Milntown House today and I have to admit knowing that woman on the left hand side of the roof and also trying to avoid the guy on the right hand side of the roof 🙂

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Milntown House © Peter Killey - www.manxscenes.com

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Standing on Port Erin Upper Promenade and looking over the rooftops towards the Lighthouse.

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Port Erin © Peter Killey - www.manxscenes.com

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Hop tu Naa – At Cooil Road in Douglas.

Do you know the difference between Halloween and Hop Tu Naa? As the rest of the British Isles prepare to celebrate Halloween on 31 October, many Isle of Man residents will instead celebrate Hop tu Naa. Historically Hop tu Naa has been considered to be the Celtic New Year, marking the end of the summer and the beginning of winter.

Hop tu Naa is celebrated with the carving of turnips for lanterns as opposed to the pumpkins that are commonly used for Halloween. Children will then go singing around the houses for hop tu Naa treats, this was once apples, bonnag and herring but as the years have gone by it’s now sweets and pennies.

Children visit the houses in fancy dress costumes and with their spooky turnip lantern. A favourite song of choice and one you still regularly hear amongst the children is the famous ‘Ginnie the Witch’ which is a traditional Manx Gaelic song.

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Hop tu Naa © Peter Killey - www.manxscenes.com

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The White Lady of Ballafreer

A peculiar rock of white quartz which has a human look about it. It is about six to seven feet high and is reputed to bring good fortune to young brides!

As you know the Isle of Man is full of history, myths and legends and lots of the stories have been handed down by oral tradition and it is difficult to find any record of them in print.

*Update from Bernadette Weyde from her excellent FB Page “As Manx as the Hills”

Extract from William Cubbon’s book, Island Heritage:

“The White Lady of Ballafreer has been an object of reverence, of wonderment, of admonition and of fear for many centuries. In view of the fact that Ballafreer was reckoned holy ground – the genesis of the name is ‘ the home of the brethren ‘ – it may have had a blessed significance, there was certainly a belief that it shed especial protection over women folk.

There is nothing elsewhere in the Island like this white quartz pillar, about six to seven feet high. A girl about to be wed would fill her mouth with the water from Chibbyr Pherick, ‘St. Patrick’s well,’ which flowed only a few yards away. Then she would walk three times around the pillar, and this must be done jesh-wise, or sun-wise, and then swallow the sacred water, saying in Manx: Ayns yn Ennym Yee, as y Vac, as y Spyrryd Noo,’ In the Name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Ghost.’ Child-bearing women also did this ritual. And, in order to be effective, it must be performed before sunrising.”

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White Lady of Baldafreer © Peter Killey - www.manxscenes.com

White Lady of Baldafreer © Peter Killey - www.manxscenes.com

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This is the original church where St Peter’s Church in Onchan now stands.

In fact this little church was better known as Kirk Conchan and the origins of the old church which stood some 50 yards to the north of the present St. Peter’s church date back to the 12th Century.

This picture is depicted in a stained glass window in the present St. Peter’s Church in Onchan.

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Kirk Conchan © Peter Killey - www.manxscenes.com

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A glorious sunset at Jurby Church tonight (12 Oct 15) looking towards the Mountains of Mourne in Ireland.

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Jurby Church Sunset © Peter Killey - www.manxscenes.com

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A beautiful old Manx Tholtan called Upper Grange, which is high up on the Narradale track above Sulby.

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Upper Grange Sulby © Peter Killey - www.manxscenes.com

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This organ came from Finch Hill United Reformed Church in Douglas after a fire there, previously the same organ was from a Methodist Church in Peel which also closed?!

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Jurby Church Organ © © Peter Killey - www.manxscenes.com

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Two images of St Mary’s Roman Catholic Church in Hill Street in Douglas.

The first view is from Bucks Rd with it’s junction of Finch Rd.

The second view is a wide angle lens shot taken from within the grounds of this beautiful Church.

This fine building, whose foundation stone was laid in 1857, opened on the 4th August 1859 with great ceremony which caused not a little adverse comment from certain elements in the Methodist community.

Built to the design of Henry Clutton in French Gothic early 13th Century style. Interior decoration includes work by Peter Paul Pugin and Sir Giles Gilbert Scott.

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St Mary's Church, Hill Street © Peter Killey - www.manxscenes.com

St Mary's Church, Hill Street © Peter Killey - www.manxscenes.com

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