Isle of Man Images

All posts tagged Isle of Man Images

T. E. Brown and the T. E. Brown Stained Glass Window at the Manx Museum

Thomas Edward Brown (1830 – 1897)

T.E. Brown was the national poet of the Isle of Man, he was born in Douglas and brought up in Kirk Braddan Vicarage where he was educated by his father until he was 15, he then attended King Williams College. He then went up to Oxford and gained Firsts in Classics, Law and History.  In 1853 he was elected Fellow of Oriel and in 1856 became Vice-Principal of King Williams College.  In 1864 he was appointed second master at Clifton, Bristol where he remained until he retired in 1892.  He then moved back to the Isle of Man and settled in Ramsey.

While at Clifton Brown wrote many poems, both lyrical and narrative, the latter being richly descriptive of Manx People and strongly dialectal.  These are included in his ‘fo’c’s’le Yarns’ beginning with ‘Betsy Lee’.  He died in 1897 on a return visit to Clifton.

The Manx Museum has a dedicated area to T. E. Brown which includes this bust by Joseph Swynnerton and this stained glass window which was designed by William Hoggett to display Manx Characters created by Brown.

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TE Brown © Peter Killey - www.manxscenes.com

TE Brown © Peter Killey - www.manxscenes.com

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Migrating Whooper Swans at the Cronk in Ballaugh (29th November 2015).

From November until approximately March, these whooper swans and many more migrate from Iceland to spend the winter in the North West of England including Ballaugh in the Isle of Man.

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Migrating Whooper Swans © Peter Killey - www.manxscenes.com

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28th Nov 15 – Took the dog out for a walk before and stumbled upon these little fellas in Ballaugh.

Now can anyone tell me if these are late this year lambs Lol or early Spring lambs for next year?

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Lambs in November © Peter Killey - www.manxscenes.com

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‘The Tree Tunnel’

On the Ballamooar Straight at Ballaugh.

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Tree Tunnel © Peter Killey - www.manxscenes.com

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The Pagan Lady

These two images were taken recently in the Manx Museum Viking Gallery.

Excavations in Peel Castle in 1982/87 revealed an extensive graveyard. The most spectacular finds were the 10th century grave of “The Pagan Lady” which included a fine example of a Viking necklace of which there is 71 differently coloured beads.

The replicate of the original beads can be seen on the Pagan Lady in both of my images.

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Pagan Lady © Peter Killey - www.manxscenes.com

Pagan Lady © Peter Killey - www.manxscenes.com

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Isle of Man – Remembrance Sunday 2015 at Ballaugh Church

“When you go home
Tell them of us, and say
For your tomorrow,
We gave our today.”

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Remembrance Sunday Peter Killey - www.manxscenes.com

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Another lovely Sunset tonight at the Celtic Cross War Memorial at Jurby Church.

“At the going down of the sun and in the morning. We will remember them”

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Jurby War Memorial © Peter Killey - www.manxscenes.com

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High up in the hills of Druidale.

There is something quite magical and mystical about these beautiful Hares.

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A Manx Hare © Peter Killey - www.manxscenes.com

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A beautiful Autumnal morning at Salmon Leap at Sulby Claddagh today, I even put my wellies on to take this piccie.

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Salmon Leap in Sulby © Peter Killey - www.manxscenes.com

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Milntown House today and I have to admit knowing that woman on the left hand side of the roof and also trying to avoid the guy on the right hand side of the roof 🙂

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Milntown House © Peter Killey - www.manxscenes.com

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Standing on Port Erin Upper Promenade and looking over the rooftops towards the Lighthouse.

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Port Erin © Peter Killey - www.manxscenes.com

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Hop tu Naa – At Cooil Road in Douglas.

Do you know the difference between Halloween and Hop Tu Naa? As the rest of the British Isles prepare to celebrate Halloween on 31 October, many Isle of Man residents will instead celebrate Hop tu Naa. Historically Hop tu Naa has been considered to be the Celtic New Year, marking the end of the summer and the beginning of winter.

Hop tu Naa is celebrated with the carving of turnips for lanterns as opposed to the pumpkins that are commonly used for Halloween. Children will then go singing around the houses for hop tu Naa treats, this was once apples, bonnag and herring but as the years have gone by it’s now sweets and pennies.

Children visit the houses in fancy dress costumes and with their spooky turnip lantern. A favourite song of choice and one you still regularly hear amongst the children is the famous ‘Ginnie the Witch’ which is a traditional Manx Gaelic song.

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Hop tu Naa © Peter Killey - www.manxscenes.com

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