House of Keys

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The Island is a Crown Dependency which, through its ancient parliament, Tynwald, enjoys a high degree of domestic legislative and political autonomy. The United Kingdom Government is, by convention, responsible for the conduct of the external relations and defence of the Island.

Dating back over one thousand years to Viking origins, “Tynwald is the oldest Parliament in the world in continuous existence”. It comprises two branches – the democratically elected House of Keys and the Legislative Council. The majority of Members sit as independents, and the virtual absence of party politics encourages a high degree of consensus. This has contributed to the remarkable stability of the Manx system.

External issues such as foreign representation and defence are administered on the Island’s behalf by the UK Government.

The 24 members of the House of Keys (MHKs) are elected every five years and represent the following ancient Sheadings of Mann – Ayre, Castletown, Douglas, Garff, Glenfaba, Malew/Santon, Michael, Middle, Onchan, Peel, Ramsey and Rushen.

The 11 members of the Legislative Council (MLCs) or upper house, generally act as a chamber which revises Bills initiated in the Keys. The royal assent to Tynwald Bills is given by the Queen or, now more commonly, by his Excellency the Lieutenant Governor on the Isle of Man.

The political head of the Manx Government is the Chief Minister, who is chosen by Tynwald from within its own ranks after each general election. The Chief Minister selects his ministers who have responsibility for the major government departments and, with the Chief Minister, form the Council of Ministers (the Manx Cabinet).

Feel free to make any comments either on this website by clicking the “Write comment” below or by logging onto my Facebook Page enjoy – Click on the image for a larger view.

House of Keys © Peter Killey - www.manxscenes.com

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The Island is a Crown Dependency which, through its ancient parliament, Tynwald, enjoys a high degree of domestic legislative and political autonomy. The United Kingdom Government is, by convention, responsible for the conduct of the external relations and defence of the Island.

Dating back over one thousand years to Viking origins, “Tynwald is the oldest Parliament in the world in continuous existence”. It comprises two branches – the democratically elected House of Keys and the Legislative Council. The majority of Members sit as independents, and the virtual absence of party politics encourages a high degree of consensus. This has contributed to the remarkable stability of the Manx system. (Click on the image for a larger view)

The House of Keys - © Peter KilleyExternal issues such as foreign representation and defence are administered on the Island’s behalf by the UK Government.

The 24 members of the House of Keys (MHKs) are elected every five years and represent the following ancient Sheadings of Mann – Ayre, Castletown, Douglas, Garff, Glenfaba, Malew/Santon, Michael, Middle, Onchan, Peel, Ramsey and Rushen. 

The 11 members of the Legislative Council (MLCs) or upper house, generally act as a chamber which revises Bills initiated in the Keys. The royal assent to Tynwald Bills is given by the Queen or, now more commonly, by his Excellency the Lieutenant Governor on the Isle of Man.

The political head of the Manx Government is the Chief Minister, who is chosen by Tynwald from within its own ranks after each general election. The Chief Minister selects his ministers who have responsibility for the major government departments and, with the Chief Minister, form the Council of Ministers (the Manx Cabinet).

The image was captured on my Sony HX20V camera, resized and cropped  in Adobe Photoshop CS6.

Feel free to make any comments either on this website by clicking the “Write comment” below or by logging onto my Facebook Page enjoy – Click on the image for a larger view.

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I spent a pleasurable hour walking around the court of Tynwald the other day during my lunch break.

All of the below images were captured on my Fuji X10 camera resized and cropped in Adobe Photoshop CS5

Feel free to make any comments either on this website by clicking the “Write comment” below or by logging onto my Facebook page www.facebook.com/manxscenes

Click on any of the below images for a larger view.

Images 1 and 2 below;

Depicts the Tynwald Chamber which has been used for sittings since December 1894 and formerly housed the old Weights and Measures office before it became occupied by Tynwald. Also shown is the table which holds the Manx Sword of State which must be present under Tynwald Standing orders before any sitting can take place.

Tynwald Court Isle of Man - © Peter Killey

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tynwald Court Isle of Man - © Peter Killey

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Images 3, 4 and 5 below;

Depicts the Sword of State which is traditionally ascribed to Olaf II , who before he became King is believed to have used it in fighting against the Moors in Spain in 1230. It may really be dated nearer 14th Century.

The Sword has the earliest known depictions of the ‘Three legs of Man’ in its oldest form, and the Legs are depicted on the Pommel and on shields set on either side of the blade where the guard intersects the blade. The sword is present at all sittings of Tynwald and is carried before The Lieutenant Governor at St Johns on Tynwald day.

The Sword is the Island equivalent of the Mace that is used in Westminster, but differs in that it points straight ahead and not left or right as in England which denotes the part in power.

Sword of State Tynwald Court Isle of Man - © Peter Killey

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sword of State Tynwald Court Isle of Man - © Peter Killey

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sword of State Tynwald Court Isle of Man - © Peter Killey

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Image 6 below;

This illustrates the legislative Council Chamber and shows the meeting table. The Council are a revising Chamber and examine in details green bills presented from the House of keys of proposed legislation.

The Legislative Council is presided over by the President and has 10 members indirectly elected by the House of Keys or Ex officio .

Legislative Council Chamber - Isle of Man - © Peter Killey

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

My grateful thanks goes to Tynwald Seneschal Mr Paul Daugherty for his excellent knowledge and advice on every aspect of Tynwald and for supplying to me the above information to go with each of the images.

If you are interested in the Isle of Man and its very unique constitution, have a look at this webpage from manxscenes.com outlining some basic facts about this beautiful island – Click Here 

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