Michael

A view today from Brandywell and overlooking Sulby Reservoir.

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Overlooking Sulby Reservoir © Peter Killey - www.manxscenes.com

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A good coat of snow at Halewood’s Height on the TT Course yesterday morning and only 168 days to TT 2015.

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Hailwood Height on the TT Course © Peter Killey - www.manxscenes.com

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The site of an old slate quarry workings at the foot of Sartfell Mountain, this old quarry is clearly visible when looking approximately South-East from the TT Course half-way up Barregarrow Hill.

This quarry originally employed about twenty quarrymen, many of whom were Welsh, who came over to the Island following the closures of quarries in their homeland. It closed in about 1874 due to the poor quality of the slate and the buildings subsequently fell into disrepair.

The ruins are those of the blacksmiths shop, stables, a pay office and accommodation for the men.

The belfry at the end of building deceptively gives it the appearance of an old church. In fact, the bell which it once housed was used to signal the beginning and ending of the mens work shifts, which ran day and night.

The old quarry building is very desolate and quite a hard place to get to it has very steep slopes and ravines to cross and a good set of walking boots are a must.

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Glion Kiark - Glen of the Grouse © Peter Killey - manxscenes.com

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This lovely old, once loved building at Cronkdoo is set low in the valley near to Druidale and is now where the hill sheep from the area go inside for shelter.

You can also make out the rusty corn mill cogs to the rear of the old building.

Whenever I visit these old Tholtan type buildings I realise just how hard life must have been for these old Manx Crofters.

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Cronkdoo near Druidale © Peter Killey - www.manxscenes.com

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I have to be honest and say that these old Manx Runic Stones and Crosses do fascinate me.

This rather strange stone (No. 110) is displayed in Kirk Michael Church and is a broken shaft of a cross slab, which in 1669 was turned upside down, reshaped and carved with a skull and cross bones. It shows remains of the double twist and ring design. On one edge part of an inscription reads, A.B. cut (these) runes.

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Manx Crosses and Slabs - © www.manxscenes.com

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This chapel is reputed to be the smallest chapel on the Island, it was built as a school and later used as an Anglican mission, it is now sadly disused and in private ownership.

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Spooyt Vane Chapel © Peter Killey - www.manxscenes.com

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A lovely little walk around this tiny village and how nice it is to see such untouched areas on the Isle of Man.

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Glen Wyllin Village © Peter Killey - www.manxscenes.com

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High up in Bishopscourt Glen is a lovely small cave with a carved stone seat. This cave is thought to have been used by bishops for the purpose of rest and meditation. Bishop Murray reputedly took refuge here from angry locals at the time of the 1825 potato (tithe) riots. Nearby is a stone called “Creg Nyn Ushag” (Rock of the Bird) which is inscribed ‘Lead me to the rock that is higher than I’, probably dating from about 1880.

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Bishopscourt Cave © Peter Killey - www.manxscenes.com

Bishopscourt Cave © Peter Killey - www.manxscenes.com

Bishopscourt Cave © Peter Killey - www.manxscenes.com

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I went into the graveyard have a look at the old grave of Bishop Wilson and got a bit carried away with my camera (as you do).

This time I somehow managed to avoid the four sheep and one ram in the graveyard 🙂

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Kirk Michael Church © Peter Killey - www.manxscenes.com

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The bottom of Barregarrow the next left hander is in to Westwood then on to the straight towards Douglas Road Corner in Kirk Michael (all in all a very fast section of the course).

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Bottom of Barragarrow on the TT Course © Peter Killey - www.manxscenes.com

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This quaint Wesleyan Chapel which is on the TT Course prior to Kirk Michael was first established in 1880.

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Barregarrow Wesleyan Chapel © Peter Killey - www.manxscenes.com

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A lovely walk down to the beach at Glen Mooar yesterday and passing this lovely Ballagawne Cottage, you can just make out to the right of the image and behind the tree, the “Thie Veg”, which is Manx for “Little House”

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Ballagawne Glen Mooar © Peter Killey - www.manxscenes.com

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